LinkedIn help – are you committing these LinkedIn deadly sins?

by | Jan 7, 2024 | Social Media | 0 comments

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Quite a few of my Content Engine members joined after initially taking part in my LinkedIn Content Challenge. So I try and check out their posts and profiles on there as often as I can.

And that’s the reason why, if any of them feel targeted by today’s tips, they probably are (sorrynotsorry)!

We all fall into bad habits occasionally (especially me), so it’s worth having  look at your account and your LinkedIn content to see if you’re on the naughty list.

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Sin 1 – tagging everyone you can think of

While I do recommend tagging people in your posts if the subject is relevant to them or you feel that they may have an opinion, don’t fall into the trap of tagging everyone you know in the hope that they will comment.

Why?

  • Because if they don’t, LinkedIn thinks that you’re spam tagging and that can affect your reach.
  • No-one who’s been tagged feels special if they’re one of 7 or 8 people tagged, and may even not bother to reply because they think the others will.
  • Tagging the same people every time you post makes it look like you’re in an engagement pod to people reading, which also affects your reputation, even if no-one is telling you.

Instead:

Only tag people if the post is relevant to them and/or you’re sure they’ll comment. Notifications are more flaky than ever right now, so tag one or two people, and if you feel comfortable, drop them a quick DM to let them know.

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Sin 2 – #All #The #Hashtags

I see this one a lot and it reminds me of the old days of Facebook when hashtags were just becoming a thing.

In an #effort to look more #natural people started #sprinkling them through their #copy. #LikeThis.

#Please #stop.

Why?

  • Nothing look more unnatural and try hard and it’s awful to read.
  • People using screen readers struggle because the reader reads out the hashtag in every sentence. And hashtag no-one wants to hashtag hear a hashtag sentence hashtag written hashtag like hashtag this.
  • You’re trying to get your personality and humanity across on LinkedIn, not write like a marketing person from 1994.

Instead:

Write as you would normally. I’m pretty sure you’re not sticking hashtags in the middle of your sentences in your real life or email communications, so don’t do it on LinkedIn. If you want to use hashtags, use 3-5 at the end of the post where they don’t get in the way.

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Sin 3 – You don’t have Creator Mode switched on

You might not think of yourself as a creator, but to LinkedIn, if you’re posting content, then you are.

So switch Creator Mode on.

Why:

  • Creator Mode allows you to have a highlighted link right at the top of your profile that you can link to your website, your booking page, your sales page, whatever you want.
  • You can add topic hashtags to your profile that help you in LinkedIn search
  • When someone looks at your profile they will see your featured section first, and the default view on your activity will be your actual posts, not comments you’ve left on other posts.

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Sin 4 – You have your job title or similar in your tagline

Copywriter. Website designer. Leadership Trainer. Marketing Manager.

I know that’s what you do, but what do you DO? What benefits do you bring? What problems do you solve?

Use your tagline to showcase your skills.

Why:

  • If your tagline is just your job title, you’re not standing out from anyone else with the same job title.
  • Your tagline is like your little bit of microcopy that people will see when you post or comment on other people’s posts – what image do you want to portray?
  • After your name and possibly your profile picture, your tagline is the thing people will remember about you.

Instead:

Think carefully about your tagline. I’m not saying go as ‘out there’ as me, there’s a thin line between bravery and stupidity, but make it stand out, make it different, make people want to click on it.

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Sin 4a – Your mini profile at the end of your posts never changes

I spoke about mini profiles very recently so I’m not going to just write the same thing again. If you haven’t read it, it’s worth a few seconds of your time.

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Sin 5 – You don’t leave testimonials

Lots of people fall into the trap of thinking they can only leave a testimonial for someone on LinkedIn if they’ve paid them to do a job.

But that’s not true – I’ve left them for people who I’ve had a free half hour chat with, who’s newsletters I sign up to, and on occasion just because I’ve loved something they’ve written.

Get into the habit of leaving testimonials or writing posts occasionally about the people you appreciate.

Why:

  • People love people who say nice things about them and they’ll look out for your content.
  • People love people who say nice things about them.
  • You’re nice.

Instead:

Get into the habit of leaving testimonials or writing posts occasionally about the people you appreciate. (These posts are always really easy posts too, so if you’ve run out of things to say, they’re a guaranteed winner).

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Sin 6 – You promote your competitors on your profile page

I’m all for the whole ‘there’s enough business to go around’ philosophy, but if people have gone to the trouble of finding and reading MY profile, I’m sure as hell not going to make it easy for them to go look at my competitors.

The ‘People You May Know’ box appears as default on the right hand side of everyone’s profile and, you’ve guessed it, it features other people that do exactly the same as you.

Switch it off. Now.

Why:

  • Your profile is meant to promote you, not other people
  • That’s it.

Instead:

Switch it off.

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Sin 7 – You don’t ask for testimonials

I get it, it’s a bit cringe, and feels a little desperate too. But as someone who shouts about her testimonials all the time (you should be doing this too, by the way) and who recently got another job based on the lovely words someone else wrote about me, I’m begging you to ask.

Why:

  • LinkedIn makes it easy to ask.
  • People often won’t think about doing it if you don’t ask.
  • What have you got to lose?

Instead:

Go to your profile, scroll down to the recommendations section, click the + button (this only works if you show your recommendations on your profile, which you should already do) and bite the bullet. Whether it’s someone you’ve helped out, someone who has paid you for work, someone you’ve paid for work, or someone you’ve had a virtual cuppa with, ask for the testimonial.

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Are you guilty of any of these sins? Fix them now and make the most of your LinkedIn Profile for 2024.

Fancy getting LinkedIn and Content tips like this every week, with a few SEO pointers thrown in for good measure? Check out my Content Engine membership group.

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